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Lessons from the field #8: Liberty in containers part 1: Java performance

As you begin to containerize Liberty applications, it's important to keep in mind how running in a container environment can affect performance. Performance tuning a Liberty container begins with tuning the JVM. The standard mechanisms that java uses to understand system resources such as memory...


Blog Entry
Lessons from the field #6: IBM Java and OpenJ9 Just-In-Time Compiler Tuning

One of the key values of Java is the Just-In-Time (JIT) compiler . This converts the hottest Java methods from interpreted code into native code at runtime. The performance difference is massive: typically, 10-20 times faster (i.e. a magnitude). The JIT is enabled by default, and, in general,...

Kevin Grigorenko's profile image

Blog Entry
What is the WebSphere Application Migration Toolkit?

You have hopefully seen our series of blogs about the Migration Toolkit for Application Binaries (binary scanner) but did you know we also have another tool to help you with your application migrations? The WebSphere Application Migration Toolkit (source scanner) analyzes your application...

Alex Motley's profile image

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Getting Down to the Details of Application Migration

So, you’re ready to migrate your application to a new environment, be it Liberty, a newer Java SE version, or a newer version of WebSphere traditional ? However, you aren’t sure what changes you might need to make to your application for it to run. That’s where the analysis report of the ...

Alex Motley's profile image

Blog Entry
Where Can I Take My Technologies?

You’ve been with your application server for a while. Things are getting stalled. It's gotten old and just doesn’t perform the way it used. No one supports it anymore. Now you want more. You've started playing around with the idea of being able to take advantage of new technologies or get your...

CHUKA OBINABO's profile image


Blog Entry
Jakarta Batch Post 116: Whole Job Step Listener

This post is part of a series delving into the details of the JSR-352 (Java Batch) specification. Each post examines a very specific part of the specification and looks at how it works and how you might use it in a real batch application. To start at the beginning, follow the link to the ...

David Follis's profile image

Blog Entry
Jakarta Batch Post 115: Partition Listener

This post is part of a series delving into the details of the JSR-352 (Java Batch) specification. Each post examines a very specific part of the specification and looks at how it works and how you might use it in a real batch application. To start at the beginning, follow the link to the ...

David Follis's profile image

Blog Entry
Jakarta Batch Post 114: Batch Properties Object (Issue 133)

This post is part of a series delving into the details of the JSR-352 (Java Batch) specification. Each post examines a very specific part of the specification and looks at how it works and how you might use it in a real batch application. To start at the beginning, follow the link to the ...

David Follis's profile image

Blog Entry
Jakarta Batch Post 113: Jakarta Batch Issues

This post is part of a series delving into the details of the JSR-352 (Java Batch) specification. Each post examines a very specific part of the specification and looks at how it works and how you might use it in a real batch application. To start at the beginning, follow the link to the ...

David Follis's profile image