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  • 1.  Relation between ASIC and SAN switch ports

    Posted 28 days ago

    Hello, 

    Does anyone know the distribution of ports and ASIC processor of Brocade SAN switches?  If you had that distribution for the SAN128B-6 it would be perfect.

    I try to distribute ISL trunks between different ASIC processor just in case of a ASIC processor failure even though such failure are quite rare. 

    Thanks,



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    Bernard Fay
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  • 2.  RE: Relation between ASIC and SAN switch ports

    Posted 26 days ago

    Hello Bernard:

    The following information comes from SAN128B-7, not SAN128B-6
    There are 12 ASIC modules; 4 as Cores, and 8 for Edges.
    Each the edges ASIC supports 16 FC ports; #0-15, #16-31, ... , #112-127.
    I hope this may help you.



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    EIICHIROH NAKAGAWA
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  • 3.  RE: Relation between ASIC and SAN switch ports

    Posted 25 days ago

    Thanks Eiichirroh, 

    Do you have a reference about this?

    Thanks,



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    Bernard Fay
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  • 4.  RE: Relation between ASIC and SAN switch ports

    Posted 25 days ago

    Hi Bernard,

    About one year ago, I consulted with a Broadcom technical sales guy, and heard about the ASIC implementation of the SAN128B-7 switch. i.e. core&edge combination.
    After that, I confirmed on my customer's machine that the portbuffershow showed the 16 FC ports boundary.
    Unfortunately, I have no log files as evidence for you.

    According to Randy Frye's comment, SAN128B-6 seems to take the different ASIC implementation from the 128B-7.
    If you can access to your SAN128B-6, you may execute FOS command "supportshow".  This command takes a few minutes to complete.
    The output will include both the "bladeportmap" and "portbuffershow" for your cofirmation.
    You can follow Rnady's comments, and can know the relationship between the ASICs and the FC ports on your 128B-6

    Eiichiro



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    EIICHIROH NAKAGAWA
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  • 5.  RE: Relation between ASIC and SAN switch ports

    IBM Champion
    Posted 25 days ago
    Edited by Randy Frye 25 days ago

    You used to be able to run command "bladeportmap" (logged in as root) to provide the asic-to-port information.  But effective 9.1 FOS, root login is disabled so this command is no longer available.

    Information can instead be obtained with 9.1+ FOS by gathering a supportsave from the switch, and viewing the ...SSHOW_ASICDB file within the supportsave.  (Looking for the fields M# = Mini-switch number = asic, and UPt = User port number.)

    Easier, the output of a "portbuffershow" command (as admin) will show all ports grouped by asic.  This output does not, however, show which asic number is associated with each group of ports.

    For SAN128B-6:

    Asic 0 = ports 0-15, 48-63
    Asic 1 = ports 112-127
    Asic 2 = ports 64-95
    Asic 3 = ports 16-47
    Asic 4 = ports 96-111





  • 6.  RE: Relation between ASIC and SAN switch ports

    Posted 25 days ago

    https://techdocs.broadcom.com/us/en/fibre-channel-networking/fabric-os/fabric-os-administration/9-2-x/v26799888/v26800033/v26799817.html



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    Stephan Meister
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  • 7.  RE: Relation between ASIC and SAN switch ports

    IBM Champion
    Posted 25 days ago
    Edited by Randy Frye 25 days ago

    Stephan,

      That document shows ISL Trunk Groups.  These are not the same as port-to-ASIC.

    In the ...SSHOW_ASICDB file, there is an additional field G# = Trunk group number, which provides the port trunk group information that matches info from the Brocade link you gave.

    Bernard,

      Besides the asics, the ISL Trunk Groups are also an important consideration (usually more so).  If you are creating only multiple individual E-port ISL's between switches, then spreading them across multiple asics provides the redundancy you were asking about.  However, if your intent is to create a Trunked EX-port for ISL between switches, all of the ports within a given trunk must be in the same trunk group.

    For the most redundancy (from https://techdocs.broadcom.com/us/en/fibre-channel-networking/fabric-os/fabric-os-administration/9-2-x/v26799888/v26800068.html):

    Consider creating redundant trunk groups where additional ports are available or paths are particularly critical.
    Redundant trunk groups help to protect against oversubscription of trunk groups, multiple ISL failures in the same group, and the rare occurrence of an ASIC failure.

      i.e. One ISL trunk on multiple ports of a trunk group on one asic, and a second ISL trunk on multiple ports of a different trunk group on a different ASIC.



    • 8.  RE: Relation between ASIC and SAN switch ports

      Posted 24 days ago

      Thanks Randy for all the information. 

      I think I'm on track and will be even better with all your information. 

      Thanks! 



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      Bernard Fay
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