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How to Monitor — -> Database → Database Usage

By Noel Dsouza posted Wed June 12, 2024 01:49 AM

  

How to Monitor — -> Database → Database Usage (IBM — DB2WOC)

 

Welcome back! Folks
if you are here first time do checkout my last blog series -- >on

How to Monitor ---> Database in Db2 Warehouse console.

https://community.ibm.com/community/user/cloud/blogs/noel-dsouza/2024/03/11/how-to-monitor-database-in-db2-warehouse-console


Now let learn How to Monitor --->  Database in Db2 Warehouse console.

Let's login to cloud IBM com

Login to the  https://cloud.ibm.com/

Then locate your  Db2 Warehouse instance / service now open the console page from manage page . Click [Open Console] Button.

 

 

 

Now , on the left pane click on the Monitor page. This will give access to multiple tabs i.e Dashboard , Database , Statement and so on

 

 

 

In this series, we will discuss the Database page .

This page has 3 Tab's on the screen

1)Database Time spent

2)Database Usage

3)Database Partition.

 

See below Screenshot  to know the Tab we are discussing

Today we are starting with the tab 2)Database Usage
 

 

On the right side of the page you can select the workload you want to drilldown further , by default it is ALL USER WORKLOAD.
 


 

2)Database Usage

As you can see in the above screenshot you can view the graph REAL TIME or for last few hours ie. 1 hour, 6 hour and so on.

At the end you also have a custom option to specify start date and end date .

 

The Database Usage tab has 16  graphs let me put them one by one and try and explain each of these.
 

    1. System CPU
    1. Data server CPU
    1. Transaction rate
    1. Active connections
    1. Logical reads
    1. Average activity time
    1. Failure activity rate
    1. Direct reads
    1. Total sorts
    1. Lock waits
    1. Physical reads
    1. Sort overflows
    1. Total compilations
    1. Rows read ratio
    1. Remote table rows
    1. Remote table waits

 

 


 

1. System CPU:

This metric measures the CPU usage of the entire system, including all processes, not just the DB2 database.

2. Data server CPU:

This metric measures the CPU usage of the DB2 database server, excluding the operating system and other processes.

3. Transaction rate:

This metric measures the number of transactions (i.e., SQL statements) executed by the DB2 database per unit of time (e.g., per second).

4. Active connections:

This metric measures the number of active connections to the DB2 database, including both user connections and background processes.

5. Logical reads:

This metric measures the number of logical reads (i.e., reads from cache) performed by the DB2 database.

6. Average activity time:

This metric measures the average time it takes for the DB2 database to complete a transaction (i.e., SQL statement).

7. Failure activity rate:

This metric measures the rate at which the DB2 database encounters errors or failures, expressed as a percentage of total activity.

8. Direct reads:

This metric measures the number of direct reads (i.e., reads from disk) performed by the DB2 database.

9. Total sorts:

This metric measures the total number of sorts performed by the DB2 database.

10. Lock waits:

This metric measures the number of times the DB2 database waited for a lock to be released.

11. Physical reads:

This metric measures the number of physical reads (i.e., reads from disk) performed by the DB2 database.

12. Sort overflows:

This metric measures the number of sorts that overflowed (i.e., exceeded the sort buffer size).

13. Total compilations:

This metric measures the total number of compilations (i.e., recompilations) performed by the DB2 database.

14. Rows read ratio:

This metric measures the ratio of rows read to rows inserted, updated, or deleted.

15. Remote table rows:

This metric measures the number of rows in remote tables (i.e., tables in other databases or systems) that are accessed by the DB2 database.

16. Remote table waits:

This metric measures the number of times the DB2 database waited for data from remote tables.

 

These metrics provide valuable insights into the performance and activity of the DB2 database, helping you identify potential issues and optimize database performance.

 

 

That’s it for today.

Thank you all , I hope this was helpful . Please feel free to let me know in the comments.

Be sure to like and subscribe to know more about upcoming blogs or series.
By — Noel Dsouza

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